Skip to main content

coincidence

  • From: Lafreniere Eglinton <detours@...>
  • To: <cvs@...>
  • Subject: coincidence
  • Date: Wed, 02 Apr 2014 01:23:20 +0700

Woman is always ugly. The passionate wom


 of the stuff of life, our every-day human life, typically upon the stage; 
with less of the traditional theatrical-academic element. The "well-made 
play" has itself undergone evolution since the days when it was an aphorism 
that not what is said but what is done on the stage is the essential thing. 
This of course is at once true and false, like every other truism. Without 
action there can be no play; and a play may be made fairly intelligible 
without a single spoken word, just as a scene from history or fiction may be 
quite recognisably depicted in a few symbolic lines, dots, and dashes, though 
no single human figure be decently drawn. We must not, however, forget that 
action itself is language. What is called the action of a play is simply a 
story told by the movements of the players. But when we see a man stabbed, or 
a woman kissed, our curiosity is excited. We want to know something more 
about the people whose actions we see. This, indeed, may be roughly told by 
gesture and facial expression, which are themselves language; but, finally, 
to understand more than the barest outline of the story, we are forced to 
demand words. And the more we are interested in human nature the more we want 
to understand the thoughts, emotions, motives, characters, of the personages 
in action before us. Hence by gradual steps have come our latest attempts at 
studies of complex characters, in their struggle to solve the problems of 
life; or what are objected to as "problem plays." Well, why object? Every 
play, from _Charley's Aunt_ to _Hamlet_, is a problem play. It is merely a 
matter of degree. Every play deals with the struggle of men and women to 
solve some problem of life, great or small: to outwit evil fortune. It may be 
merely to persuade a couple of pretty girls to stay to luncheon in your 
college

Attachment: shadbush.jpg
Description: JPEG image



coincidence

Lafreniere Eglinton 04/01/2014
 
 
Close
loading
Please Confirm
Close