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Last updated December 31, 2012 14:15, by rwarburton

There have been a number of posts to this list on the topic of the committee and it's activities, but we thought we'd better bring it all together under one post with regards to how it came to be, its structure and how you can join in!

What's the goal of this Committee?

  • Primarily we want openness and transparency in the creation of Java Standards.
  • Equally as important, we want the end users of these standards (that would be Java developers) to have a say in the standard before it becomes ratified.

What if I don't agree with the committee?

We don't own anybody!

The reality is that with >2000 members, all we can do is try to represent you as best as possible. We do this by canvassing opinions, especially at events such as the developer sessions, talks and of course, the recent open conference. You've probably also seen the regular blog posts and mails asking for feedback as well.

'Adopt a JSR' is yet another feedback mechanism we have in place.

We especially want to hear from you if you do disagree with us! The wide range of opinions we have, the more accurately we vote for the community at large. And of course you can join the committee and add your direct vote (see "How do I join?" below).

Who's currently on the Committee?

And of course Barry Cranford keeps his hand in as the Founder of the LJC and keen 'Adopt a JSR' supporter.

How did this committee form?

We originally sent out several posts asking for volunteers for the LJC JCP Committee. The initial group of people that volunteered was Ben Evans, Martijn Verburg, Trisha Gee, Simon Maple & James Gough. Michael Barker, Richard Warburton and Somay Nakhal have been added since (see "How do I join?" below).

How do I join?

The JCP Committee consists of a "meritocracy of the willing". That is, if you want to join and are willing to put the effort in then after a couple of monthly meetings the committee adds you in (after a simple majority vote). So far everyone that has wanted to join has been accepted, we're very much an open shop on that front!

The barrier to entry is relatively low. The minimum requirement is that you put in some effort - that is:

  • Regularly turn up to the monthly meetings
  • Actively review JSRs
  • Support programs such as 'Adopt a JSR'
  • Write the occasional blog post

It helps to have a good understanding of the overall Java ecosystem and some open source and software patent laws, but we can mentor people in all of those areas. The time effort required is typically about 5 hours a week for a committee member, with the JCP EC reps putting in extra hours for EC meetings and extended research (10-20 hours/week).

Travel is required for the primary rep (or the appropriate back up) for a F2F meeting 3-4 times a year. As we are a Java User Group - Oracle picks up the flight and accommodation expenses for that rep (we're talking economy class and a reasonable hotel, so this isn't the 5* perk the rep was looking for ;p).

How does the committee vote/organise itself?

Simple majority voting applies, this includes voting who the primary, secondary & tertiary reps are and voting on JSRs etc.

Is the mailing list public?

Sadly not. This is the unfortunate reality of discussing legal issues (under NDA in some cases) and other information that the committee is given in strictest confidence.

So what do you make public then?

Everything that we possibly can! So our minutes (with some legal stuff redacted), our voting strategy and record. We're certainly the most open and transparent member of the JCP EC and are encouraging the other members to follow suit.

Are there any former committee members that who deserve thanks for their time served?

  • Mike Barker
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